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Renting out a rental property is not always an easy ordeal.

There's tons of responsibility and landlords are typically required to do things they may not enjoy.

One of the things that a landlord or a property manager doesn't look forward to doing is the eviction process.

Landlord-tenant laws require landlords to follow certain guidelines and procedures when going trying to evict a tenant. And, since they can face legal repercussions if not followed, they are obligated to carefully follow the entire process.

However, it can be very tricky, especially for landlords and property managers who have never evicted a tenant.

In this guide, we will be going over the complete guide to evicting a tenant, including what can lead to one and how to carry one out smoothly and legally.

To begin, let's go over what an eviction is and what causes it.

What Is An Eviction?

An eviction is the legal process in which a tenant is removed from a rental property. This can also be known as a repossession or an unlawful detainer.

A tenant can be evicted for many reasons, most of which are pretty self-explanatory. Below, we will be going over a complete list of reasons that a tenant may be evicted.

Tenant Does Not Pay Rent

One of the most common reasons for a tenant not to pay rent is that they do not pay rent. Although a landlord may be a little flexible with the due dates and may accept late payments, the unpaid rent can get to a point where action must be taken.

Some of the situations that may stop a tenant from paying rent include a change in occupation status, business closure, major medical condition, or a change in family status. If the tenant owes rent from many months, the landlord may choose to put them on a payment plan.

However, if the tenant violates continuously by not paying rent and the past due rent continues to pile up, you may need to evict the tenant. This written notice serves to let the tenant know that they are being evicted. We will cover more about these notices down below.

Illegal Activity On Rental Property

Another thing that a tenant could be doing that can quickly get them evicted is conducting illegal activity on the property. This could include selling or distributing drugs, prostitution, gambling, or running a business out of the property. All of these are violations of the rental agreement and can be grounds for eviction.

Also, it is important that you, as the landlord, notify local law enforcement about any illegal activity. If you simply allow the illegal activity to continue, you may be creating problems for the neighborhood and be held liable.

If illegal activity were to be happening within one of your properties, there is good news. This kind of eviction process can be done faster than other kinds. This means that you can get the tenant evicted much faster, as per eviction laws.

Violating Other Lease Provisions

Another common reason for landlords to start an eviction process against their tenants is because they violated the lease agreement. Some common examples of this may include the tenant having a pet, the tenant having a roommate, or problems with the HOA.

It is important to note, however, that most of these violations should not lead directly to an eviction. For example, if the tenant has a roommate but agrees to kick them out immediately, they should not be evicted. However, the landlord or property manager should then monitor this tenant very closely.

If the tenant continues to make the same violations, then an eviction should follow. The landlord or property manager should make sure to collect as much evidence as possible of the violations in case they need to be proven in a court hearing.

Destroying the Property

Tenants who damage the property past the point of normal wear and tear can also be evicted from the property. This could include holes in the walls, broken windows, torn carpet or cracked flooring. These damages are typically discovered during a routine inspection that the landlord conducts.

Eviction laws vary, but some states allow you to use the security deposit to cover the damages. However, many times, this amount of money is not nearly enough to cover the damages. This is because the state eviction laws can also limit how much can be collected as a secuirty deposit.

Although there could be some other reasons, most of them are similar to what we have just discussed. In the next section, we will be going over the actual process of evicting a tenant.

How to Evict a Tenant

Although laws vary by state, the general process remains roughly the same. Below, we will discuss every step that a landlord typically takes to evict a tenant.

Review Local Laws and State Laws

The first step before you even draft any eviction notices is to review all relevant local and state laws. These laws vary by state, so it is important that you search for the laws that pertain to your specific state. Not sure where to find them? Visit DoorLoop's Laws Page to discover more about your state's specific laws.

Knowing these laws can also help when you are writing your lease agreement. If you include them in the original signed lease agreement, it will be easier to evict the tenant.

There might also be some laws regarding evictions and COVID-19. It is extremely important that these laws are reviewed because they can completely void your eviction efforts.

Determine the Reason for Eviction

As discussed above, every landlord needs a legitimate reason for wanting to evict their tenant. Right now would be the time to refer back to the original lease agreement and check for specific tenant violations.

If the tenant is in direct violation of the lease agreement, it could be a lot easier to start with the eviction proceedings. If this is the case, it is especially important to document enough evidence of the violations before serving a formal eviction notice.

This documentation is typically in the form of photos, videos, or even communications between the two parties. It is important to be as thorough as possible in this step because the more evidence that you have, the more likely you are to win the case.

Issue a Formal Eviction Notice

If all attempts at compromise have failed, it is time to officially evict the tenant. The first step in doing this is to serve the tenant a written eviction notice. The purpose of this document is to inform the tenant that they are being evicted and give them a set time period to take action.

An eviction notice will typically grant the tenant a few days to correct their violations. If they do not do anything within that time period, they should be informed that their case will be taken to court.

There are three different types of eviction notices:

  • A pay or quit notice
  • A cure or quit notice
  • An unconditional quit notice

All of these notices serve a different purpose. The pay or quit notice orders that the tenant pay any unpaid or overdue rent. If not, they will have to be evicted. The cure or quit notice is essentially the same thing, but instead of paying back rent, they must fix the violation that they are committing.

Finally, the unconditional quit notice requires the tenant's belongings to be collected and the tenant to vacate the property immediately. This is the most impactful of the three and is typically only used when violations such as illegal activity occur.

Filing For Eviction

The next step of the eviction process is actually filing for eviction. To do this, you must go through the court system.

When in the court hearing, you will be required to show proof of the violations, as well as proof that you gave the tenant propert notice before filing for eviction. This could be either with a certified mail receipt or the tenant's signature from the day.

Depending on the state, there are different things that courts require during an eviction hearing. For this reason, be sure to visit DoorLoop's laws page to review all of your state's laws.

Evict the Tenant

Finally, after winning your court case, you can evict the tenant from your property. This is done by the judge of the court. The judge will give the tenant a set number of days to evict the property.

At this point, many tenants choose to willingly leave the property as they have run out of options. If not, it may be necessary to contact law enforcement to assist in removing the tenant. If it gets to this point, the police officer can give the tenant 48 to 72 hours to vacate the property. In extreme cases, physical force can also be used.

After the tenant has been evicted, you may still want to reclaim the unpaid rent. To do this, you must file with a small claims court. They will then handle the procedures to get you your unpaid rent.

Also, it is important to refer to local and state laws regarding what to do with the tenant's belongings. Since many states have different laws regarding this, it is vital that you know exactly what should be done in your specific case.

David Bitton

David is the co-founder & CMO of DoorLoop, a best-selling author, legal CLE speaker, and real estate investor. When he's not hanging with his three children, he's writing articles here!